Affiliate marketing involves selling goods and services online and earning a commission for each sale. Commission percentages vary from company to company. Affiliate marketing can be profitable for both companies and affiliates – as long as the rules of Internet marketing are followed.

Over the past few years, poor marketing practices including spamming, false or misleading advertising and marketing tactics, phishing schemes, and Internet fraud have increased.  These practices carry heavy fines or time in prison for both companies and affiliates.

Understanding the rules of online marketing can help affiliates avoid poor marketing practices and help companies avoid huge lawsuits due to affiliate misconduct.

Creating a Profitable Affiliate Marketing Program

Companies can increase profits and brand awareness through a well-thought out affiliate marketing program. This includes creating rules and guidelines for affiliates to follow, only allowing those qualified to sell goods and services, and monitoring affiliate activities to ensure affiliates adhere to the ruled governing online marketing.

Maintaining an honest relationship with affiliates by paying promised commissions, providing training, and mentoring affiliates so they become successful sales people help create a profitable marketing program.

Becoming a Successful Marketer

Successful affiliate marketers understand the rules governing online marketing. These rules prohibit spam advertising and email harassment. Marketers must also respect the rules of online forum posting, create honest ads, and adhere to additional guidelines outlined by the companies they work for.

The Lexero Law Firm

Hire an experienced attorney to review affiliate marketing guidelines to ensure your company is adhering to the rules of online marketing. A Lexero lawyer can also explain your rights if involved in litigation involving one of your affiliates.

Attorneys at the Lexero Law Firm also help affiliates in need of legal advice or assistance when facing a lawsuit or complaint or if a company fails to pay the promised commission rate for goods and services sold.